From:  Frank Rogers

   Dated:  May 2, 2017

Subject:  Protocol of the Navy

Group, 
At memorial service for a CHP partner there were two enlisted men only,  and one  presented the flag.

    From:  John Kafka

   Dated:  May 2, 2017

Subject:  Protocol of the Navy

I am not sure on regulation, but highest ranking person seems about right.  I have as a Command/Force/Fleet Master Chief had the honor of presenting the coffin/casket flag to the family if they were present.  Often in recruiting as a young Chief I was the senior Sailor present, and if I did not do it, no one else would have.

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Protocol of the Navy

May 2017

AFVN Group Conversations

     From:  Joe Ciokon

   Dated:  May 2, 2017

Subject:  Protocol of the Navy

P R O T O C O L. !!!  Were we not Broadcast Journalists?  I was a newspaper editor before I got the Broadcaster NEC.

Geez.

JoeC

[NB: Joe corrected "protocol" in his message but he left it as "Protocall" in the message subject line!  Webmaster]


     From:  Ken Kalish

   Dated:  May 2, 2017

Subject:  Protocol of the Navy

Larry,

What's a CHP?

Ken

    From:  Ken Kalish

   Dated:  May 2, 2017

Subject:  Protocol of the Navy

Dickie: 
Yes, an enlisted person can present the flag to the closest relative of the deceased.  The only difference between an officer-led funeral detail and one led by an enlisted person is what they say when presenting the flag.  An officer says “On behalf of the President of the United States …” and an enlisted person says “On behalf of a grateful nation …”  The rationale is that an enlisted person cannot speak for the President.  I’ve led several such internments, and for Navy, Marine, and Army personnel.  Except for Marines, it is difficult out here in the wilderness of Northern Minnesota to find willing participants.  I usually turn to National Guard, Army and Navy Reserves for help. 
Ken Kalish

    From:  Dick Ellis

   Dated:  May 2, 2017

Subject:  Protocol of the Navy

Some of you old timers....Am I incorrect in thinking that the graveside military honors call for the flag to be presented to the family by the highest ranking officer present or at least a commissioned officer?  I have never seen the casket flag presented to the family by an enlisted person.  I see several officers in the ranks behind....am I wrong? 
FLAGS FOR MILITARY FUNERALS: Flags are provided for burial services of service members and Veterans. The flag for one who dies on active duty is provided by one's branch of service. Flags for other Veterans are provided by the Department of Veterans Affairs. The flag is presented to the next of kin at the end of the funeral, usually by the military chaplain. If there is no next of kin present, the flag may be presented to the Veteran's close friend or associate if requested. After a flag has been used for a Military or Veterans funeral, it should never be flown again or displayed in any other way than in the tri-fold shape in which it was presented to the next of kin. In other words, the folded flag should never be "opened" again. There are many appropriate display cases available for purchase to display the burial flag and to protect it from wear and fading.

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     From:  Frank Rogers

   Dated:  May 2, 2017

Subject:  Protocol of the Navy

California Highway Patrol.  Remember John and Ponch on CHiPs? 
CHP is actually a deceptive name.  It is more like the State Police or State Patrol in some states. 
Any Road, Any Code  meaning any place and any crime.  Also provides security for the Governor, State officials and Buildings. 
Frank


     From:  Brian Russ

   Dated:  May 3, 2017

Subject:  Protocol of the Navy

I have been to over a hundred funerals at the Sarasota National Cemetery.  The flag is always given by the highest ranking person but that can be anywhere from a Sergeant to a Captain or Major.  I went to one of a Brigadier General and the presenter was a Full Colonel. I have mostly seen Enlisted, Warrant and Commissioned Officers as a presenter of the flag.

Brian Russ