​    From:  Rick Frederickesen
     Date:  September, 26, 2015
Subject:  Important Article to Share
Two take-aways I had  after reading this: 1. This is why AFVN was so important to the guys in Vietnam; a sense of community and that we were in this together. 2. Perhaps this is why many of us are still hanging together with the AFVN Yahoo/Facebook groups now: we are still a unit, even today. I agree with everything you said Nancy, but the story almost makes too much sense to be fully true. 
Rick

​    From:  Anonymous
     Date:  September, 26, 2015
Subject:  Important Article to Share
​You are correct, Sir.

AFVN Group Conversations

​    From:  Frank Rogers
     Date:  September, 26, 2015
Subject:  Important Article to Share
Got [the] message:  "This webpage is not available." 

Roger

​    From:  Rick Fredericksen
     Date:  September, 26, 2015
Subject:  Important Article to Share
​Jeez. These are your family members!!!  Right??? and YOU.  Probably only I would get this, but much appreciated.  (If I am correct.)

​    From:  Anonymous
     Date:  September, 26, 2015
Subject:  Important Article to Share

​To try and fall in line with this story, here are some case senerios: 
1.) Soldier 1 is wounded in combat and receives a Purple Heart after taking fire from an 88 in the battle of the Hurtgen 

Forrest.  He talks easily of this wound and the drama that played out to extract him back to the rear for surgery and recovery.  He points out that this experience likely saved his life.  However he struggled to discuss other more popular battles of the time due to the casualties he witnessed and his perception of who was responsible for those losses. 

2.) Soldier 2 receives no physical trauma from war, and never saw direct fire.  However he lived in a world of regular indirect fire and threat of infiltration.  He witnessed losses on both sides.  He was able to discuss this when asked, but couldn't get past a point where he nearly killed one of his own. 

3.)  Soldier 3 receives no physical wounds of combat and sees no direct combat.  He experienced no friendly losses.  But he struggles dealing with non combat related events.  The effects of suicide of a close friend, and two military mentors haunts him constantly.  He also responded to stateside emergency duty where scenes of tragic and catastrophic losses creates nightmares.  He deals with these issues by being not less involved in helping society...he in turn makes himself overly active in many cases with anything related to public service. 

    From:  RIck Fredericksen

     Date:  September 26, 2015

Subject:  Important article to share.

This article is stunning; it turns PTSD upside down and raises important questions about our very culture. The author does not seem to be a kook--in fact, this is unbelievably documented. Read it all. It really seems groundbreaking to me. How about you?

 How PTSD Became a Problem Far Beyond the Battlefield

PTSD 

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

September  2015

​    From:  Nancy Smoyer
     Date:  September, 26, 2015
Subject:  Important Article to Share
​I have a lot of respect for Junger and I remember when I read this weeks ago wanting to disagree with some of it because it went against what we'd thought for years.  But as you say, Rick, it's well-documented and some of the surprising information I'd heard years ago, e.g., that many/most suicides happen before deployment.  When he talks about the bond of community, he certainly knows whereof he speaks from his own experience with combat troops. 
Since I'm not involved with treating vets anymore, I don't know what the VA/Vet Centers are saying about this.  I haven't seen anything in the media aboutthese new studies either.  Bottom line, though, is still war hurts. 
Nancy